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Tag: fort alexandria

A Visit to Fort Alexandria, MN

Big Ole - photo by Susan Stayer

In an earlier post I shared photos of Big Ole. At 28 feet, he’s Alexandria, Minnesota’s tallest resident. Across the street from Big Ole is The Runestone Museum and Fort Alexandria. According to the brochure I picked up, the museum is “dedicated to preserving the history and heritage of Douglas County.”

Fort Alexandria is almost an exact replica of the old stockade built in 1862 by the Eighth Regular Infantry under the orders of the governor of Minnesota. The original fort was two blocks from the current location.

The fort was the center of social and commercial activity for the entire region, and as the population grew, the fort expanded to include a general store, a church, a school, a blacksmith shop, a wash house, and a smokehouse.

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Nowadays visitors can wander freely through the buildings.

This roll is part of my 2014 52-Rolls Project. All of the photos from this roll, my 23rd, are on Flickr in the Roll 23 album.

 

Hanging With Big Ole in Alexandria, Minnesota

Wendell and I took a drive to Alexandria, Minnesota, to check out the Runestone Museum and Fort Alexandria. And of course see Big Ole!

The Runestone Museum’s website says:

The Kensington Runestone and the enduring mystery of its origin continues to be the hallmark of the Runestone Museum. This intriguing artifact was discovered in 1898, clutched in the roots of an apen tree on the Olof Öhman farm near Kensington, MN (15 miles southwest of Alexandria). The Kensington Runestone has led researchers from around the world and across the centuries on an exhaustive quest to explain how a runic artifact, dated 1362, could show up in North America.

For more information on the stone, check out the museum’s website. The museum includes the “Snorri,” a 40-foot replica of a trans-Atlantic Viking ship.

Big Ole is across the street from the Runestone Museum. He’s 28-feet tall so it’s hard to miss him! He’s got an entry on the RoadsideAmerica website if you’re interested in learning more about him.