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Tag: Holga

Snow in Yellow Springs

This is my first winter in Yellow Springs, Ohio, and so far it’s been pretty mild. We got a little snow so I thought I’d take a walk and start my 2016 52-Rolls Project off with a roll of expired Ilford SFX 200 loaded in a Holga. The film expired in January 2009 and I developed it myself. Talk about out of practice! I hadn’t developed film since 2013 or so. Anyway, here are some highlights:

I call this “The Chicken Coop House” because it’s a house that started out as a chicken coop. Yep.

The Chicken Coop House

Snowman

The Old Union Schoolhouse

This time I’m using a Holga exclusively the project. I thoroughly enjoyed my year with the Film Photography Project’s Debonair. I love crappy plastic cameras, especially medium format ones. The Holga is always so much fun.

As with my earlier 52-Rolls Projects, all of the photos from this roll are in my Flickr Photostream if you’re interested in seeing them.

To 52 Roll or Not To 52 Roll

Holga Microclicks in Key West

So we’ve just about reached the end of 2015 and it’s time to think about what I want to accomplish in 2016. I have to admit I felt a pang of guilt for not doing a 52-rolls project this year like I did in 2013 and 2014. But ultimately I just wasn’t feelin’ it.

darren_portrait_final#2

Now the old photo mojo is coming back and I’m going to go for it again — this time with a Holga. I love that goofy camera! I picked up my first one back in 2005 or so. It was my first medium-format camera and even now I’m amazed any images come out of it at all. It just seems like magic.

R1-07441-0011

I was also inspired to go for it after reading Alex’s post about his 52-rolls project for next year.

52 rolls or bust!

Flags for the Fourth and a Surprise Find

For the 33rd roll of the year, waaaay back in July, I loaded a Holga with Kodak Portra 400 and set off through the neighborhood to see if I could find some flags or other patriotic symbols. I didn’t find very many flags, but I did come across a boulder marking the last known remains of the Kaposia Indians. It’s in a small grassy area in the middle of a neighborhood.

w-140619990002

Kaposia actually refers to the seasonal settlement within the current limits of South St. Paul, Minnesota. The settlement was founded in 1750 by a group of Dakota on the Mississippi River. According to Wikipedia,

In the early 1800s, over 400 Dakota would use Kaposia as their place of residence, living there over the warm summer months. In 1837, the village was moved to the western side of the river, and then moved again due to the Treaty of Mendota, which gave white settlers the right to settle in the region.

When the photos came back from the lab, I felt a strange disconnect between the flags that are displayed to celebrate American Independence Day and the stone noting the obliteration of the native people.

All 11 photos from this roll are in the Roll 33 album on Flickr.

More From the Great Minnesota Get-Together

I’ve got a few more photos from the 2014 Great Minnesota Get-Together to share. I have to say I was blown away by the size of the fair. So many things to see and do — and eat! So many things on a stick! Even hotdish.

Hotdish on a Stick
Hotdish on a Stick

We only went once, but I can see how you need to go multiple times to see and do everything.

Check out my previous post about the fair: The 2014 Minnesota State Fair, Part One.